Liverpool John Moores University

Liverpool John Moores University


Bioarchaeology is interested with topics such palaeodemography, past behaviour, biological affinity, subsistence strategy, and health and well-being in the past. The programme will help you to develop a broad understanding of these issues through the excavation and analysis of human and animal remains. Analytical techniques will cover dental and osteological analyses, archaeological field methods, and ancient genetics. The programme aims to develop your advanced practical skills in skeletal analysis, making use of the department�s well-equipped specialist laboratories and reference collections. A particular strength of our provision and Faculty expertise is that we are able to address the bioarchaeology of many world areas and time periods. When you complete the course, you will have all the skills necessary to continue into an academic career or gain employment in research, museums, education or commercial organisations. The programme will help you understand the: Use of techniques from both physical and genetic anthropology to describe human remains from archaeological contexts; archaeological techniques for the recovery of human remains; reconstruction of various aspects of human life from the skeleton; physical settings and contexts in which human remains are found. In order to do this, you will learn how to: Apply a broad knowledge base of human osteology and biology to a range of real and theoretical archaeological applications; evaluate the burial contexts of human remains and use this to determine the natural and anthropogenic processes involved in creating them; operate in a range of science contexts, and take responsibility for their contributions and outputs; generate information using primary observations of human osteology and use these to form responses to the problem presented.

Entry requirements

You will need an Honours degree (minimum 2.2) in anthropology or a related field. Alternative qualifications, coupled with a significant period of relevant work experience, will also be considered.

Course modules

Core modules: Advanced osteology and skeletal pathology; bioarchaeology (bones, teeth and genes); excavation; dental anthropology; dissertation; research methods. Option modules: Fire investigation; taphonomy and trauma analysis; human identification and forensic DNA.

Assessment methods

You will complete oral presentations, poster presentations, a portfolio, dissertation, project reports and grant proposal assessments. The Master's dissertation project comprises 1/3 of the total number of assessment credits within the programme.


Qualification Study mode Fee Course duration
MSc Full-time - 12 months

Campus details

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Key information

Course Enquiries
Telephone number: 
0151 231 5090