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University of Salford

Physics

Research areas include: Applied optics, laser applications and theory; Laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy, nanomaterials, photosensitivity of glasses, holographic techniques, photonic crystals and thin films. Related theoretical research often focuses on non-linear (e.g. Raman, Kerr, metamaterial, and band-gap) effects exploited in contexts such as laser applications, device designs, waveguides, and medical physics. Chemical physics and biomaterials: Growth, synthesis and properties of thin films, transition metals, precursors, crystals, biomaterials and interfaces. Techniques include: chemical vapour deposition processes, molecular simulations, surface functionalisation and thermodynamical analyses. Contexts involve: catalytic semi-permeable membranes, photonic band-gaps, self-assembled and 'smart' structures, hybrid cements, and biosensors. Complexity, applied non-linear science and metamaterials: Analyses of electromagnetic waves in materials and many-body phenomena. Work supports applied materials research and draws on universal concepts such as fractals, spatio-temporal solitons, vortices, patterns and chaos. Contexts include: Technological materials, linear and non-linear waves (fluid, optical, elastic), complexity, multi-scale analyses, pattern formation and fluid dynamics. Energy conversion and storage: Fundamental studies into photovoltaic materials have been undertaken at Salford since the 1970's. Research involves the development of new hydrogen storage materials, with application to: fuel transport systems, magnetic phase transitions, and hydrogen-bonded systems. Environmentally-friendly technologies and fuels are developed, alongside a range of nuclear energy materials. Magnetism and nanomaterials: Magnetic, electronic and structural properties of novel materials (involving metallic alloys, amorphous materials, biological nano-magnets, superconductors, and nano-wire systems). Information storage, sensing and actuation applications of thin films and bulk materials are studied, along with new nano-crystalline magnetic phases (formed from amorphous precursors). Materials Characterisation and Modelling: first principles atomistic modelling is employed to predict material properties; simulations of structure and dynamics permit understanding and design of materials with optimal properties, particularly with a view to comparing with inelastic neutron scattering data. Further work involves: design and modelling of next-generation high-efficiency solar cells; quantum entanglement and single-photon sources; and semiconductor materials. Structural analysis and functional materials: Thermodynamical and biomolecular considerations, magnetostrictive effects, mica glass ceramics, and phase transformations and crystallisation. Techniques involve: x-rays, neutrons and muons at Central Facilities, alongside imaging and spectroscopy methods. Atomic collisions and ion-beam physics research investigates a variety of topics, involving: electron microscopy, film deposition and plasma studies.

Entry requirements

Applicants require a physics or physics related degree discipline to be considered. For PhD applications, a minimum of an upper 2nd Class undergraduate degree is required. A Masters degree is preferred but not essential. Applicants for the MPhil degree should have a minimum of a lower 2nd class undergraduate degree or relevant experience. We welcome applications from students who may not have formal/traditional entry criteria but who have relevant experience or the ability to pursue the course successfully; the Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) process could help you to make your work and life experience count. The APL process can be used for entry onto courses or to give you exemptions from parts of your course; 2 forms of APL may be used for entry: the Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) or the Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL). English requirement for non-UK/ EU students is an overall IELTS score of at least 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in any one element.

Qualifications

Qualification Study mode Start month Fee Course duration
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (EU) 3 years
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (England) 3 years
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 13,050 per Year 1 (International) 3 years
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Northern Ireland) 3 years
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Scotland) 3 years
PhD Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Wales) 3 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (England) 5 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 6,525 per Year 1 (International) 5 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Northern Ireland) 5 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Scotland) 5 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Wales) 5 years
PhD Part-time October 2016 GBP 6,525 per Year 1 (EU) 5 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 13,050 per Year 1 (International) 1 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Northern Ireland) 1 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Scotland) 1 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (Wales) 1 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (EU) 1 years
MPhil Full-time October 2016 GBP 4,052 per Year 1 (England) 1 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (EU) 2 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (England) 2 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 6,525 per Year 1 (International) 2 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Northern Ireland) 2 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Scotland) 2 years
MPhil Part-time October 2016 GBP 2,026 per Year 1 (Wales) 2 years

Campus details

Campus name Town Postcode Region Main campus Campus Partner
University of Salford Salford M5 4WT North West

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